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Orchestral





Mare Berger's arresting chamber pop expands on "The Moon Is Full," new LP out 5.26

Much like its lunar namesake, “The Moon Is Full” waxes gradually from the quiet piano and somber vocal performance of singer-songwriter Mare Berger to full chamber-pop instrumentation, becoming luminescent while maintaining a central, melancholy energy. The track, centered around Berger’s vox and lyricism, details the “sudden loss of a loved one and the pain and healing that comes after,” its impassioned theme amplified by the track’s increasingly expansive instrumentation — “I pray that the seed will grow,” Berger sings, their voice becoming more confident, transitioning from raw pain to acceptance as cinematic background strings expand in a flush of raw emotion. Dramatically-rendered yet wholly human, it’s an arresting effort, one that promises more raw, orchestral offerings on Berger’s forthcoming LP The Moon is Always Full, out June 5th — until then, stream the single below. Photo by Ilusha Tsinazde

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PREMIERE: Bandits on the Run soundtrack modern love in new short film "Love in the Underground"

The baroque-pop sensibilities of New York trio Bandits on the Run well make for cinematic music — with vivacious cello lines intertwining with acoustic guitar, and three part harmonies as a centerpiece, there’s a goosebumps-inducing element to their tunes, a plethora of hair-raising moments wherein the band’s distinct parts emerge from quietude into a full, sunny sound. It’s fitting then that their newest single, “Love in the Underground,” was released alongside a nine minute short film for which the track serves as score (and in which the band serves as background players), enabling listeners and viewers to become swept up by the band’s dynamic, driving performance. Visually charting two strangers (actors Jason Gotay and Michael Hartung, themselves a couple IRL) falling in love on the subway, their dialogue is told primarily through choreography and music, a conversation which spans several station stops along the L and the East Williamsburg streets, before settling in at an atmospheric speakeasy — where the film visually enters its second act. Transitioning from an upbeat, primarily string-forward approach to the tone of a piano-driven ballad, Bandits on the Run re-emerge in the bar to perform a slower, more somber rendition of the track, creating a visual and sonic B-side to the entire production that builds to this featurette’s heartfelt climax. An impressive endeavor by any metric, aided by production from veteran companies Chucklehead and Must B Nice and choreography from co-director Lane Halperin, it’s required, sweetly succinct viewing in a time where love might seem far away — though it could just be one train car over. Watch it below. Photo by Fletcher Wolfe

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PREMIERE: Green and Glass's debut is a mystic chamber-pop overture, play Threes Brewing 3.4

It’s rare that a record is able to capture a perfect balance of forward momentum and somber reflection, yet this is precisely what New York avant-pop ensemble Green and Glass have accomplished on their debut full length. Such conflicting feelings are likely a product of the band’s methodical instrumentation, the joining of parts from the old world (harps, horns, and drums) and the new (keys and electric bass), which as set pieces for bandleader Lucia Stavros’ show-stealing, often mysterious lyricism, creates an intergenerational atmosphere — chamber pop that feels as modern as it does baroque. This tone is set early in the record on “Green and Glass” and “14 Hours,” whose march-like tempos, somber brass lines and cool synths serve as distinctive introductory fanfares; while the song’s formats may seem familiar at first, the script is immediately upended by the band’s diverse instrumental offerings. This energy continues throughout standout track “Sand,” where the unison of harp and electric guitar against a stuttering percussive line paves the way for an ethereal overture that perfectly blends woodwind and midi leads. In all, Green and Glass delights and surprises at every turn, a lush, experimental yet accessible record that will feel immediately at home with fans of San Fermin or Hundred Waters — stream our premiere below, and catch the band at Threes Brewing on March 4th for their record release show. Photo by Maura McGee

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Sarah Golley spills her heart in new record "As We Crawl"

An authentic poet is Norwalk, Connecticut’s Sarah Golley: the artist’s complete devotion to maximum exposure is the trademark of her latest record As We Crawl. From the spoken poetry of the opening track, “From the Sea,” to the grandiose string-instrument-driven composition that backs up her soulful vocals in “At a Snail’s Pace” the album opens majestically. The honeyed symphonies continue in tracks like “Over Time” and “Into the Flames” where the melodious grand piano keys fire away as Golley dramatically spills her heart; the music takes on a rich theatrical form that is as exquisite as it is immersive. Sarah Golley channels ferocious energy in the vein of artists like Amanda Palmer, yet her music has a softer touch to it that is rooted in the theatricality of it all. Tracks like “On the Treadmill of Thought” hypnotize with vibrant harmonies and thunderous kick drum patterns. From the onset, As We Crawl requests one surrender their thoughts and emotions entirely to each piece, weaving both for an experience unique, and satisfying. Listen to the gravity with which “Through a Black Hole,” from the new album, blossoms below. - Rene Cobar, photo by Jesse Newman





Happy Birthday, Deli Magazine New England!

There are so many things to be grateful for today: family, friends, good food, good times. Here at Deli New England, we are grateful for one more thing, and that is the opportunity to cover New England’s always-thriving music scene. For ten years, we have been privileged to witness the rise of talented artists from Connecticut’s New York border to Maine’s Atlantic seaboard. Since the birth of this branch, on this date ten years ago, we have had our many editors explore with delight hip-hop acts, indie-pop darlings, rock-punks, and so much more. Below you will find nine posts from different editors of this magazine over the last ten years. A big thank you to Meghan Chiampa for kicking off this journey and letting me know of the special occasion at hand. Happy holidays and happy reading! - Rene Cobar

Meghan Chiampa on Brendan Hogan (2010)

Chrissy Prisco on Boy Without God (2011)

Dean Shakked on High Pop (2012)

Jake Reed on Deja Carr (2013)

Daniel McMahon on Here We Just Dream (2014)

Zach Weg on And the Kids (2015)

Olivia Sisinni on Dreamtigers (2016)

Cameron Carr on Clairo (2017)

Lilly Milman on People Like You (2018)

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