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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!





Sofi Tukker Fires Up Stubbs On A Cold Night

 

“I dare you not to dance! I dare you not to dance!” Haiku Hands has a next-level understanding of how to get a crowd to start moving, and that sometimes means using reverse psychology.  The Aussie power-dance quartet asked the crowd to lose control while they danced, and a large Stubbs crowd was willing to oblige since most of them were their to shake their ‘rumbas’ to Sofi Tukker anyway. Haiku Hands served as a perfect opener to Sofi Tukker, stirring up the crowd’s willingness to dance on a chilly October Austin night.

 

Sofi Tukker exploded onto the stage with sexual physicality that was emphasized by pulsating rhythms and primitive percussion. If it was Sofi Tukker’s intention to coax the animalistic tendencies out of the crowd, they succeeded all too well. The throng of dancers in the crowd had created an amorphous vibrating organism of bliss.  Songs like “Fuck They” and “Mi Rumba” continued to level-up the energy with each consecutive track.

 

The beauty of a Sofi Tukker set is their song quality is strong enough to sprinkle in hits at the outset but still have enough to backload the end of the set and encore. “Swing”, “Best Friend”, “Batshit” and “Purple Hat”  all rapid-fired with out regard to the physical limitations of endurance for those who were dancing. The set would end with the duo’s most romanticized track “Fantasy” which allayed the crowd with beautiful deep house odyssey. A one-song encore would ensue in which they would play “Drinkee” and send the sweaty crowd smiling into the Austin night.

 

 

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Rye Mountain Revelry Teases Upcoming Debut Album

 

In just seven tracks, Rye Mountain Revelry firmly plant their musical roots and sonic identity. Their self-entitled debut weaves together a cross-country pattern of folk, country, and bluegrass. Summoning back the Alternative Country movement of the 90’s, RMR, leaning more Son Volt than Wilco, use this borrowed nostalgia to springboard their work into the modern landscape. A slew of instrumentation envelops the grounded songwriting to create a feeling that the listener is just as much a part of the musical experience as the musicians. “Holler Siren Serenade” finds itself in Dwight Yoakam’s wheelhouse, while the close inter-gendered harmonies on “Whiskey Moon” hearken to an Appalachian Fleetwood Mac. 

 

    The union of Eric and Anna Madden forms the beating heart of group. Meeting in Nashville in 2014 and marrying in the same church as Johnny Cash and June Carter in Franklin, Kentucky, the couple’s musical prowess grew and developed with their life partnership. Originally only playing lead fiddle on Eric’s songs, Anna began to collaborate lyrically until beginning to write on her own songs like “(Take Me Back to) Turquoise Mountain.” With difficulty finding like-minded bandmates in Nashville, the Madden’s ended up in Austin in 2017. Producer and multi-instrumentalist Eric McKinney of Wonderland Studios helped Anna and Eric track and overdub the EP before finding bassist Barret O'Donnell and drummer David Pearson via Craigslist. RMR now write and arrange with a full a full band in mind.

 

    Imagery of human connection and moon-lit desert landscapes fill the songs with a wistful yearning to get out of the confines of city life. “Without the distractions and isolation-effect of big city life,'' Eric explains, “it allows people to draw closer together and look to each other to see the value each of us has, as well as the inherent value and beauty of nature. Walking up the mountains at night and seeing the stars without any light pollution to the soundtrack of a lonesome train whistle in the distance was something I was extremely blessed to have as part of my raising and development.” These sentiments are not only reflected in the recordings, but also in the band’s future plans. As much as they love Austin, they hear the calls of “honkytonks and dance halls” from all over Texas. 

 

    With an upcoming show in San Marcos on November 9th at Tantra Coffee and plans to begin production on a full length record this winter, keep up with Rye Mountain Revelry on their website ryemountainrevelry.com and Facebook page. 


- Hayden Steckel

 

 

 

 





Julia Jacklin Seizes Full Moon Folk Magic at the Parish

 

Julia Jacklin headlined at The Parish on Saturday with Christian Lee Hutson opening the show. These two folk-playing song-writing masters seized the full moon energy to entrance the audience in joviality despite their somber songs.

 

Christian Lee Hutson played a solo set on the acoustic guitar, most notably was his rendition of “I Just Can't Fucking Do It Anymore.” A gentleman dressed in all black with a white collar, he countered the melancholy vibes of his lyrics with playful interactions with the audience between songs. 

 

Julia Jacklin began her set with “Body” from her latest album crushing, released earlier this year. She appears as a humble angel, a siren from Sydney in a vintage plaid skirt and her hair clipped behind her ear. Her humility and humor complement her striking vulnerability. She shares with the audience that her music career started with her performing Evanescence’s “Wake Me Up Inside” at the high school talent show. 

 

The band moved into “Don’t Know How to Keep Loving You.” They’ve been saving the disco ball for this moment. The dancing spinning lights illuminate the room with blues and greens as soon as the electric guitar introduces the melody. The lights lighten the punch of the convicting lyrics: “don’t know how to keep loving you/ now that I know you so well.” Be careful thinking about that one. 

 

She encored with “Comfort” and I kind of resented her for it because I didn’t want to cry, but this song...the way her voice trembles, the slow soft chord progressions, the words she strings together and how they all coalesce to gently assault your heart with the truth. A song of affirmations following the pain of breaking up, Julia sings, “You’ll be okay. You’ll be all right. You’ll get well soon and sleep through the night,” and in the next verse, “He’s gonna thrive. He’ll be just fine.” It’s truly a positive song dressed in an achy tone. No matter where you are, you’re not alone in pain. Even angels like Julia Jacklin have experienced heart ache as part of our human condition, and her art aids to heal herself but also those who listen.  

 

Thank you, Julia, for your vulnerable display of affection and art. You inspire tender hearts to trust and stay tender even after they’ve been bruised. 

 

-Melissa Green 

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