x
the_deli_magazine

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

Cancel

nyc





Thurlowood quietly soundtracks the end on “Shells”

Conventional wisdom dictating the world will end not with a bang, but with a whimper, seems to be playing out famously, but at the very least we’ll get some good music out of it. New video “Shells” by New York “pre-apocalyptic electro indie rock” project Thurlowood is the latest to cover Armageddon in a quiet, dignified, and incredibly catchy manner. With the cool keys of a Nord Electro 6 and a rudimentary drum machine backing, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Andrew Thurlow Wood sings Cold War-era instructions to schoolchildren on what to do in the event of a nuclear attack. Against a music video incorporating archive footage of a 1951 educational film, Wood’s haunting vocal delivery simultaneously emphasizes the futility of such directions were an actual tactical strike ordered on the United States, in addition to the fragility of our continued existence as a human species. Reminiscent of the Postal Service’s similarly depressive earworms and Ra Ra Riot circa 2013’s Beta Love, it’s a beautiful, harrowing single that’s a perfect soundtrack for our increasingly precarious times — give it a watch below, and stream new LP Discontinue Normal Program, out now. Photo by David Yang

|




Bottler's sunny electronic blossoms on "Nobody Likes Me," new EP out 5.8

Synthpop outfit Bottler describe their sound as music “full of electronic vitamin C,” an apt description of their uplifting new track “Nobody Likes Me.” Bolstered by a chilled downtempo beat and a healthy mix of piano keys and speaker-shaking bass, the Brooklyn-based duo employ a repeating sample of a children’s choir as the song’s centerpiece, creating a joyful, bright atmosphere over its succinct three minute run time. Moreover, Bottler’s approach to production, which incorporates maximalist, shimmering synth arpeggios alongside analogue components, evokes the late 00s / early 10s indietronic sound of groups like Passion Pit and Discovery sans vocals. Stream this sunny listen below, and keep an eye out for their upcoming EP Clementine, out May 8th.

|




PREMIERE: Onesie get crafty in quarantine for new video "Unsolved Mysteries"

Self-isolation-bred productivity can come in many forms, and whether it’s reading a good book or posting on Instagram about your sourdough starter, there’s really no wrong way to do it. Erring on the side of the creative is Brooklyn indie outfit Onesie’s new video for “Unsolved Mysteries,” which, through iMovie magic and a photo scanner, lovingly displays the mid-80s childhood drawings of bandleader Ben Haberland. Scoring these high resolution scans of Mortal Kombat (or G.I. Joe?) inspired illustrations is Onesie’s power pop inclined sound, albeit on the scuzzier side; Haberland’s winding vocal delivery modulates between the bright melodic quality heard on the band’s 2019 effort Umpteenth, breaking on the chorus to deliver some frothy sing-speak disharmony. Bolstered by driving, interlocking guitar work and lyricism drawing parallels between mental subjugation and sheltering-in-place, it’s a progressive bop for fans of 90s / early 00s alternative, or those seeking to enliven the feeling of being trapped — either way, watch and listen below.

|




Hayfitz charts the human condition softly on "Kitchen"

It’s been an engaging (and exciting) experience to see the through-line developing on Capsules, the forthcoming debut record by New York-based folk soothsayer Hayfitz, something one could liken to reading sections from a diary non-linearly. New track “Kitchen” maintains a similar environment to previous single “Daylight,” as Brandon Hafetz’s quiet, impressionistic recollections of the past drift over evenhanded guitar chords and lush analogue synths, but while Hafetz’s last single detailed the harsh truth of being honest and having “sober conversations,” “Kitchen” feels like a fresh start. A repeating chorus of questions (“What’s your name? What’s your story?”) emphasizes the different kind of intimacy the single details, the terrifying prospect of knowing someone else and being known yourself. Once more, Hafetz’s focus on the vulnerable nature of the human condition, the pain inherent to our interconnecting lives, is rendered brightly, beautifully, and softly, through trembling falsetto and an intrepid blend of acoustic and electronic sounds. Give it a listen below ahead of his LP’s release on May 29th. —Connor Beckett McInerney

|




Monster Furniture detail day-to-day living on new track "Social Distancing"

The aptly titled “Social Distancing” by Brooklyn-based outfit Monster Furniture captures the feelings inherent to our new lives indoors — a lofi metronome beat, anxiety-adjacent walking bass lines, and lyrics detailing our new “curious days” convey well the inertia of sheltering-in-place, outlining both the few joys of staying home (like feeding baby carrots to the dog [as a treat]) amidst the various long sighs that fill our impossibly long days. Moreover, Monster Furniture’s inclination towards occasional melodic resolves and sweet falsetto reprieves from a predominantly downtempo, minor offering embeds the track with a sense of yearning, which paired with a lyrical grocery list of indoor-friendly activities that occupy time as we wait for the pandemic to end, seems to cautiously look on the bright side, while accepting the less-than-ideal nature of our current, sickness-stricken reality. It’s a kind, deeply human tune, and recommended listening for days spent doing the same tasks, over and over again — stream it below, alongside the other thematically similar tracks on Shred City Presents’s Quarantine Compilation.

 

|
|
|

- news for musician and music pros -

Loading...