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-- The 60's --
The 13th Floor Elevators
Janis Joplin
-- The 70's --
Stevie Ray Vaughan
Asleep at the Wheel
Willie Nelson
The Skunks
Townes Van Zandt
Guy Clark
Jerry Jeff Walker
-- The 80's --
The Dicks
Marcia Ball
The Butthole Surfers
Joe Ely
The Fabulous Thunderbirds
Nanci Griffith
-- The 90's --
Lucinda Williams
Arc Angels
Shawn Colvin
Alejandro Escovedo
Fastball
Jimmie Dale Gilmore
The Gourds
Robert Earl Keen
James McMurtry
Toni Price
Kelly Willis
-- The 00's --
Okkervil River
The American Analog Set
...Trail of Dead
Explosions in the Sky
Patty Griffin
Sara Hickman
I Love You But I've Chosen...
The Octopus Project
Okkervil River
Bruce Robison
Spoon
The Sword
What Made Milwaukee...
   


This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

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Interview with Dead Fame

- by Dawn Reed

Deli: How did the band start?

Christopher DeNitto (synths)- I was faced with either start a new band or kill myself.

KC Byrnes (guitar)- Chris and I met up with Eric, then added Sadie.

Sadie Powers (bass)-  I ran into KC, Chris, and Eric at a dance party. They said they were looking for a bass player. I had played music with KC before and was looking to do another project with him, so I'm glad it worked out.

Michael Means (vox)- Eric kept talking about the band he had joined and how they couldn't find a good singer. I finally convinced him to let me try it out and to meet the rest of the band, still unnamed at that time.

What are your biggest musical influences?

Eric Klemen (drums)- Prior to Dead Fame, I was heavily influenced by bands like Q and Not U, Braid, Shiner, June of 44, Mercury Program, Engine Down, and others. Since Dead Fame, I've been seeking out more electronic and dance influenced music for the sounds and beats found in these genres.

Means-  That's tough: so many. I like powerful singers and performers, mostly: Freddie Mercury, David Bowie, and Tina Turner for example.

Powers-   Bauhaus, Steve Reich, Mingus, Nina Simone, Stereolab, Joan Jeanrenaud.

Byrnes-  ESG, The Clash, Sade, Sigue Sigue Sputnik.

DeNitto-  Old school goth, new romantic, post punk, synth pop, witch house, indie remixes.

What artists (local, national and/or international) are you currently listening to?

Powers- Einsturzende Neubauten, Suicide, and The Birthday Party are always on steady rotation. The new Dirty Beaches is the best album I've heard this year, and SAL MINEO is also fantastic. It’s a side project of Eugene Robinson from Oxbow and Jamie Stewart from Xiu Xiu. Also currently revisiting PJ Harvey's early albums.

DeNitto-  Trust, Thieves Like Us, Suuns, S.C.U.M., M83, The Knife, Holy Ghost!

Byrnes- Future Islands.

Klemen-  White Lies new release, "Big TV.”

Means- It's been a lot of Ssion this past year, but I've also been listening/streaming my Tanlines station on Pandora a lot. Just this past week I've listened to a lot more from Perfume Genius because we are opening for him at the Midpoint Music Fest this September.

What's the first concert that you ever attended and first album that you ever bought?

Byrnes-  First concert was Rod Stewart.  I think I was 12, my mom was a big fan. First album:  X,  More Fun In the New World.

Klemen- First concert: Smashing Pumpkins in high school. First album: Bon Jovi's Slippery When Wet when I was 6 years old.

DeNitto-  First  concert: The Cure, First Record: Michael Jackson Thriller.

Means- I'm pretty sure it was Puff Daddy and "the family," with Lil Kim, Mase, etc. in high school. I guess that was cool then, and I'm still on team Lil Kim; she's the real queen B. I think the first album was actually the Ace of Base cd, "The Sign." I still have an affinity for pop crafted by Swedes: Robyn, Abba, Peter, Bjorn and John, Roxette, Lykki Li, Jens Lekman, The Sounds, The Knife.

Powers-  I practically stole my mom’s copy of Ziggy Stardust when I was four. Does that count? Otherwise, Smashing Pumpkins, Siamese Dream. I saw Sting in high school. “Roxanne” is an awful song to begin with, but being subjected to a 17-minute calypso rendition in the middle of his set just took it to a whole new level. I don’t think I’ve ever fully recovered.

What do you love about Richmond's music scene?

Means- There's a good variety of bands and genres, although I believe we are the most truly unique thing happening right now. There are a lot of music lovers and people who support and like making sure music keeps happening here.

Powers- I love that people in the scene just make things happen. We have a strong and eclectic noise scene.

Klemen- The music scene reflects the size of the city itself, not too small to go unnoticed, not too large to be oversaturated. It's rich and diverse.

DeNitto- People actually go to shows, and there is a lot of diversity in styles.

What would you like to see change in the local music scene?

Byrnes- Less "quietly intense" boring bands wearing cut off shorts.  It is just a really lazy way to be a musician.

Powers- I think this applicable to every music scene, not just Richmond’s, but I wish that bands pushed themselves more, both in composition and performance. If the point is to connect with people on a deeper level, then why are you just going to stand around looking bored and play the some tired bar chords? I don’t have time to watch you think you look cool on stage.

Means- I guess that while there is a good variety of bands, there are still a lot of bands that are also harder to differentiate from the next. Maybe I would like to see a little less "folk" and banjo on the scene, and a bit more synth and pulse--but again, that's why we are so unique.

Klemen- People need to turn off the Top 40 tracks and experience the local venues and talent in their own back yard. Venues should run tighter shows. Richmond's pretty lax about doors at 9, but music not starting until 1-2 hours later. It messes with people's schedules when planning to go out, that it sometimes becomes a deterrent.

DeNitto- I would like to see more mid-level venues bringing bands that are too big for small clubs but not big enough for huge theaters or stadiums.

What are your plans for the upcoming year?

DeNitto- Party.

Byrnes- Release a 12" vinyl EP with some great remixes. An official video and hit the road.

What was your most memorable live show?

Means-  Our first EP release was good: packed house, mirror ball full of condoms and glow sticks that was smashed like a pinata over the audience.

Klemen-  Cincinnati's Midpoint Music Festival last year. There's a sense of accomplishment that comes with traveling to a city far from our own, where people likely haven't heard us before, and getting an overwhelming positive response.

Powers- I'd also have to go with MidPoint. At one point, I looked over to the side and saw a couple making out under this giant portrait of a drag queen. That was probably the highlight of my career as a performer.

Is there someone who has helped your band grow through support?

Klemen-  Our friends and families who have graciously let us sleep in their spare beds, basements, and kitchen floors when on the road. And of course, our local RVA fans who have been very supportive since the beginning.

Byrnes- Most everyone at the WRIR radio station has been really supportive.

Means- We've had great support from local dj's, music writers and bloggers, and definitely our friends, who have all helped spread the word about our music.

Is there a piece of equipment you couldn't live without and why?

Byrnes- My guitar. I would have nothing to play in the band without it.

Klemen- Chris' computer. It controls everything - the synth, our tempo, the lights, our souls. KC and Chris made a home-made lighting rig that's lightweight and travels well. It certainly sets us apart and gives our set energy.

DeNitto-  Mainstage from Apple. It's been the best live performance tool I have ever used.

Powers- I've been playing the same bass for 15 years. It's my first and only, and I would be emotionally wrecked if anything ever happened to it. Everything else is expendable.

Means- Tape for the mic: I have a habit of pulling the mic cord from the mic during the frenzy of performances, and nothing's worse than vocals dropping in the middle of a particularly impassioned phrase.

 

 

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Dead Fame
My Body My Fool

 

 
 
 

 

Pleasure Curses Latest Video "PNKLKR"

 

DC's post-punk eletro duo Pleasure Curses have recently released a cleverly creative video from Parisian director Guillaume Thuillier for their synth-wave track "PNKLKR." PC lays down a chill-pop score while life moves in reverse around the actress. Check it out...

See Pleasure Curses live Aug 24 at Comet Ping Pong and Sept 5 at DC9.

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Megaphone Barons Album Release Party

DC's Megaphone Barons will be playing an album release party, at DC9, on Saturday August 24th. Megaphone Barons are releasing their second EP, "here.us.now." Fan contributions allowed them to team up with their favorite record producers/engineers: Justin Long (U.S. Royalty, Shark Week, Dance for the Dying), Mat Leffler-Shulman (Future Islands) and mastered by Alex Saltz at APS Mastering (David Bowie, Vampire Weekend, R.E.M.). They will be signing a limited number of freshly pressed CDs, and their modern chill-wavey vibe will be joined on the bill by the folk sounds of Letitia Vansant & the Bonafides, and psychadelic folk-rocker Andrew Grossman. --Natan Press


Second Annual Pussy Riot Concert, Friday, August 16th.

From Amnesty International's press release for the event: "Amnesty International members, activists, rock fans and artists will show their support for Pussy Riot and Human Rights in Russia at the second annual punk protest beginning at 6 p.m. on Friday, August 16 in front of the Russian Embassy. The concert will take place the day before the one year anniversary of Pussy Riot's sentencing and approximately six months out from the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, Russia."

The event will include local DC bands Soft Punch, G.U.T.S. and Jail Solidarity, and speakers from the human rights movement and Russian diaspora. Come show your support for the women of Pussy Riot, the LGBTI community and other Russians who have been denied their basic human rights to freedom of expression by wearing balaclavas and holding a variety of visuals from 6-9 p.m., on Friday, August 16th, in front of the Russian Embassy (corner of Wisconsin Ave. and Edmunds St. NW). --Natan


Thievery Corporation at 9:30 Club 8/16 & 8/17

It's time for the annual marathon of electro at the 9:30 Club as DC's own Thievery Corporation return for two nights on stage this Friday 8/16 and Saturday 8/17. Friday is sold out already, of course, but there is still a chance to get tickets here for Saturday's show, or try and win them below!

We've teamed up with our pals the 9:30 Club to get one lucky Deli reader on the list for TC's 8/17 show! All you have to do is email us by 3 PM on 8/16 and let us know your favorite Thievery Corporation track. Please include your first and last name for guest list requirements. The winner will be emailed back.

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Ticket Giveaway: M.H. & His Orchestra @ 9:30 Club 8/9

 

After a growing success of consistent performances around the DMV and a fabulous music video release (see below,) Jammin Java's 8th Battle of the Band winner M.H. and His Orchestra will be headlining at the 9:30 Club this Friday 8/9.

We paired up with 9:30 Club to get one of you lucky readers on the guestlist. All you have to do is email us by 4 PM TODAY 8/8 and tell us why you love M.H. & His Orchestra. Please include your first and last name for guest list requirements. The winner will be emailed back. There is still time to grab tickets here.

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Ticket Giveaway & Interview with Luray

 

(photo by Le Feng) The sounds of Luray’s first album, The Wilder, are both ethereal and earthly, the sound of the sun reflecting on grass, and the breeze caressing wildflowers. Named after the town in Virginia, Shannon Carey (Luray’s songwriter and delicate evocative voice) translates her experiences in Virginia and DC perfectly to record. “It's tall grass, wildflowers, rolling green hills, endless fields and cows grazing in the valley hit me at the time when I discovered these songs were within me, and I was coaxing them into form. The lush life in the Shenandoah Valley in early spring helped convince me that the songs were worth writing.”

A transplant from California, Shannon comes from a musical family. “I always played music. My family does music. My parents are both musicians and my brother plays drums for Bon Iver.” But after going to college for social work, she stopped playing music, until a fateful night. “I had a dream about playing the banjo. I was living in California. I had a dream that I got a guitar, but I was wishing that it was a banjo, and I had never really thought about that before. And when I woke up I thought ‘I want a banjo.’” Click here for the rest of the interview. -Natan

You can catch Luray live on Aug 24th at Sixth and I Historic Synagogue. We've teamed up the venue to get one lucky Deli reader two spots on the guestlist! All you have to do is email us by 3 PM on Aug 12 and let us know your favorite Luray song.  Please include your first and last name for guest list requirements. The winner will be emailed back.

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Interview with Luray

- by Natan Press

The sounds of Luray’s first album, The Wilder, are both ethereal and earthly, the sound of the sun reflecting on grass, and the breeze caressing wildflowers. Named after the town in Virginia, Shannon Carey (Luray’s songwriter and delicate evocative voice) translates her experiences in Virginia and DC perfectly to record.  “It's tall grass, wildflowers, rolling green hills, endless fields and cows grazing in the valley hit me at the time when I discovered these songs were within me, and I was coaxing them into form. The lush life in the Shenandoah Valley in early spring helped convince me that the songs were worth writing.”

A transplant from California, Shannon comes from a musical family. “I always played music. My family does music. My parents are both musicians and my brother plays drums for Bon Iver.” But after going to college for social work, she stopped playing music, until a fateful night. “I had a dream about playing the banjo. I was living in California. I had a dream that I got a guitar, but I was wishing that it was a banjo, and I had never really thought about that before. And when I woke up I thought ‘I want a banjo.’”


“I was so happy when I played music,” continues Shannon, “that I really wanted to start writing music again. I had written songs in high-school as a kid, but never as an adult and certainly not on banjo. I wanted to write songs outside of the bluegrass genre, but still on the banjo. The songs are written like on a guitar, but on the banjo. The songs are written like a combination of folk a bluegrass.” Having come with her husband to DC, the new environment provided the inspiration of tension and environment that fed perfectly into her new artistic ambition. For instance, “the song Kalorama is about moving into an apartment in DC. Song is about how DC is kind of intense, it’s a fast pace. We moved to Kalorama in Adams Morgan. The song is just about the desire to create a refuge from the intensity of DC. DC also seemed posh and nice and it felt like we didn’t belong.” 


Shannon’s musical influences are no less significant. She cites works by Wye Oak, Imogene Heap, Bon Iver, and Frou Frou, as well as older singer songwriters like Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell and Rufus Wainright as being significant to her sound. While those influences are clear, and anyone who likes those artists will like Luray, her sound has a unique quality that focuses on and revolves around her banjo. The banjo is layered, starting with a “strumming pattern banjo, then finger picking bluegrass style, and then melody. I try to keep the banjo sound really clean.” All the other sounds on the album compliment the banjo’s thin tone. Shannon provides her own lilting harmonies on the album, and keyboards and guitar are augmented with slight effects to produce a vibrant shimmering background. 


Despite the initial stress of DC life, Shannon has made this city her home. She now works in the city, while living about an hour away in “rural, country feeling” southern Maryland. “We can play music out here and no one gets mad, and the band can come out to practice.” And the DC music scene has been welcoming. “People are friendly, and we’ve been able to play a lot of shows. It’s been easy to book shows. There’s not a lot of folk bands like us, but a lot of rock bands have been open to having us on the bill.” 


The live sound has proven to be an interesting challenge for the band, as the lush layers are hard to replicate on stage. “Live, I’m trying to make it sound like the album as much as I can, but there’s limits. Most of the instrumentation is acoustic. Our live show is a bit more rockin’. We have drums.” Luray is hoping to tour as much as they can in the next year, before writing a new album that may be a bit more upbeat (“more drums”) than The Wilder. You can catch Shannon and Luray on August 24th at the 6th and I Historic Synagogue.

 

 

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