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-- The 60's --
The 13th Floor Elevators
Janis Joplin
-- The 70's --
Stevie Ray Vaughan
Asleep at the Wheel
Willie Nelson
The Skunks
Townes Van Zandt
Guy Clark
Jerry Jeff Walker
-- The 80's --
The Dicks
Marcia Ball
The Butthole Surfers
Joe Ely
The Fabulous Thunderbirds
Nanci Griffith
-- The 90's --
Lucinda Williams
Arc Angels
Shawn Colvin
Alejandro Escovedo
Jimmie Dale Gilmore
The Gourds
Robert Earl Keen
James McMurtry
Toni Price
Kelly Willis
-- The 00's --
Okkervil River
The American Analog Set
...Trail of Dead
Explosions in the Sky
Patty Griffin
Sara Hickman
I Love You But I've Chosen...
The Octopus Project
Okkervil River
Bruce Robison
The Sword
What Made Milwaukee...

Welcome to the new Deli Charts, organized by genre and scene.

To rank the artists with the star system go to the Top 50.


scene blog

Deli Readers,

I know, it seems like we put our latest issue out just the other day - but no, we haven't switched to monthly. It's just that the fall in NYC is a busy time for us, and with CMJ week and our NYC Synth Expo (linked to BEMF) coming up, there's a lot to write about.

Here's our 44th issue of The Deli NYC (one of our finest!). Check out cover band Stolen Jars, they'll be performing at one of the (several) Deli CMJ 2015 shows!


The Deli's Staff

October 02, 2015

Peligrosa, Austin’s premier Latin electronic music collective, has just teamed up with Houston-based collective Bombón to release what is absolutely one of the can’t-be-missed beat records from Texas this year. Now, electronic music collective is a term that probably brings up images of a council of brightly colored rave-outfit bedecked youths sitting about a table in their most regal of kandi jewelry and discussing molly-related group policies (No? Just me?), but in Austin, that concept more often refers to the complex and eclectic crews of veteran electronic producers like Applied Pressure, Feedback Alliance and the legendary Peligrosa.

Peligrosa has been a shining beacon of fun, smart beats in Austin since their birth back in ’07, and just this year they have taken their hard-won production and music-industry acumen to the next logical step by creating Discos Peligrosa, their very own label.


This record, a split aptly titled BOMBÓN X PELIGROSA, is one of the first releases by Discos Peligrosa as a new label, and it features Peligrosa and Latin robot soul mates Bombón taking turns dropping killer tracks one after the other for 7 stellar pieces of future Latin dance music. Both of these groups are all about taking the traditional sounds of Latin instrumentals and song structures (especially beats) and melding and exploding them from their original states into the newtech, future-leaning world. Both crews are on point in their efforts toward this highly commendable endeavor with BOMBÓN X PELIGROSA, which is exciting and dynamic from end to end and is actually scientifically impossible to avoid dancing to (Being Ultra Music Expert Geniuses, we know this to be a fact.).


Of particularly special note on this record are the kick-off track “Chamba” by Bombón and “Santa Marta” from the Peligrosa side of things. “Chamba” comes in with a bit of a hip-hop meets Latin electronica thing, and whose oddly reassuring deep demon vocals anchor the track’s party vibe to somethin’ that’s fun-ly sinister (I get the evil toons from Who Framed Roger Rabbit dancing to it in my head). “Santa Marta,” on the other hand, starts out about as light and chill as a track can with some pan flute bars, but this being Peligrosa, it quickly transitions to some bouncy melodic dance mallet-work (something like a xylophone sounds like) and then to straight-out, nuts-ass electronic wonkiness at 1:11 in. Frankly though, that’s just my particular taste on this record when it comes to best tracks, because there is not a weak one in the bunch here. Slink-beat album-closer “Vientos” with it’s Atlantic City boardwalk in 2060 vibe almost knocked off “Chamba” for my top spot, and the weird warped hedonistic “Me Gusta” is definitely one of the best weed tracks since Madvillain’s “America’s Most Blunted.”


Get up on this thing below and blow your friends minds by dropping some of the most undeniably sick future dance music available in the world at yer next party instead of That Goddamned EDM again, and keep up with Peligrosa at their blog here, which is frequently updated and has some pretty damn decent writing if we do say so. Viva Peligrosa.

September 29, 2015

Austinites, assemble! A cute indie band needs your help gettin' you more of that sweet, jangly music you crave. Local act Grey Lakes has finished the big majority of a record they're hoping to release this year, but they need a little help along the way to finish up those persnickety and expensive things that come with record-creating like mastering. They're running an indiegogo page right now to raise the funds (as of this writing it looks like they need about $4k in 9 days), and they've released a couple of singles to show you lovely potential listeners what they can do for ya.

The two tracks released so far, "Sea Foam Green" and "Our Blood" are nice little pretty-ass indiepop gems that deal with classic pop concepts, but bring them out in ways that feel refined as opposed to tired. There's much twangly, floating guitar here and breathy vocals that feel like they hearken back to when indie was more rock-pop and didn't have as much of the folky influence goin' on yet. "Sea Foam Green" is especially heavy on the indie-pop side, and the band does very well with the components of this genre to layer them just so in the track so that it culminates in a droney, well-balanced and pleasing way with all layers present.

Puttin' out a record is a tough thing, and really most musicians outside of the biggest acts put a ton more into these financially and in terms of hours worked than they actually get back out of it, and you can help make it happen and also get yourself a nice bit of music to listen to by headin' over to the page and droppin' a dollar or two of beer money. Check out the tracks below, and help these guys out if you feel so inclined. The scene needs you to live, remember that kiddos.

September 29, 2015

If you're into the non-radio-play hip hop scene even a bit, you know that the Drake "Back to Back" freestyle diss track that the sports-cursing Canadian dropped on SoundCloud a month ago has been just about the only off the cuff verses anyone has been hearing lately (63.9 million plays as of this posting), so much so that the thing must be paying all of Soundcloud's bills by its own damn self at this point. So, maybe now we think is a good time to be reminded that just 'cause one really famous rich dude made another sort-of famous rich dude look somewhat goofy in a fairly decent freestyle rap, Drake's verses weren't good enough to end all of freestyling forever. Hell some of them ain't even that good- there's def cats out there who hold down rapping's most difficult and impressive tradition with much more power and skill, and they're still droppin' bombs on SoundCloud even after the Destruction of Meek Mill at the Hands of the Canadian Aubrey Drake Graham.

To wit, give yer brain an ice-cold dose of Austin's David Shabani and his newest release, a freestyle good enough to be an album track called "YUL to DFW" that'll get you right cool for these last few mind boiling summer days. Shabani is, as the track's title might suggest to those who are hip to the locational acronym game, a Texan via French Canada who has been building a rep and a fan base here in Austin through a consistent, quality output of tracks (a ton of his stuff is free on SoundCloud) and some big damn shows like an appearance at the 2014 X Games out at that big fuckoff rich person racetrack thingy. "YUL to DFW" is catchy like some kinda head-noddin' virus and does everything a truly good freestyle does- it's fast, smart as hell, it sounds so clean and put together it's hard to believe it's all off the dome, and you wanna jam it again a few times just to catch everything.

Freestylin' should be part approachable shit, like references to pop culture and current events or common daily life shit, and part personal perspective and peaks into the rapper's life. Shabani knows this, flows this and nails this, dropping in everything from bits on Star Wars, Anita Baker, Montreal not having an NBA team and even looking for the remote in the couch while sticking in personal shit like a bit on his life story, such as in the hook (the part that'll definitely get stuck in your head) where he lays out he went from "Montreal to Hamilton/Hamilton to Dallas/Dallas down to Austin/Feelin' good, feelin' awesome." That call-out to these four heavily populated areas should make it instantly dig-able by anyone with the good fortune to live in any of em, and should especially hit with Austinites, this city being so full of transplants and all (for better or worse, though in Shabani's case certainly for the better).

Let Shabani get up in your head and move that mildly great Drake piece right along into the museum of old freestyles where it belongs, and also get introduced to one of Austin's solid young rappers heading up the Most Likely to Succeed pack in this city's scene with this freestyle below, as well as his other tracks over at the internet's home for new hip-hop tracks before Meek Mill just loses it and tries to burn down their server warehouses.

September 16, 2015

A question for the kids (meaning all you fine folk 25 and under) before we get to the review of the super-solid recent 3-track output by local band Hovvdy that we got on a split with also damn good band Loafer. Right, so: do y’all still know Pavement? I mean, I don’t expect anyone who was born in a year numbered higher than 1990 to be jamming anything like Archers of Loaf or (definitely not) proto-indie like Minutemen, but Pavement is still a big deal….right?

Oh god, I hope that’s right; I’m just gonna keep believing it with my fingers in my ears to block out the chorus of “Who?” that I expect. Knowledge of the bands from the pre millennium that made music what it is is especially relevant to me when it comes to this review, because that kind of 90s indie that opened the doors for rock music to be both pop and experimental while also being approachable is super helpful in understanding is why these Hovvdy tracks are such soul-touchers for the fan of indie from days before the festival and the internet changed the genre into the massive machine that it is in 2015. Not that it’s bad now. Far from it. But, it’s very different now. There was a time when you really couldn’t expect even most music fans to know the shit you dug, and that’s the ancestral grounds where these three Hovvdy tracks seem to be returning back from on some sort-of musical time-warp pilgrimage: they drip 90s, and that drip is sweet (…though that sentence is kinda gross).

I figure that Hovvdy probably gets what I mean here to some degree, because they go so far as to use the term “slack” as one of the tags on the Bandcamp page for their part of the split, a term that very specifically references 90s indie, and an attitude which Hovvdy quite embodies with their tired-of-the-world’s-shit vocals and lyrics about houses and weird relationships and being an introspective person. Take this verse from second, gorgeous slow sleeper track “Phase” for instance: “i still feel you're special to me/everyone around agrees/it must be my phase of nothing/nothing sounds so easy to me/i can let things pass right by me/i was made that way.”

In terms of sound, you can clearly hear all the elements of your standard “Band” on these three songs- guitars, drums, keys and vocals are all quite distinct and easy to pick out- and the tracks are readily identifiable as yer “indie rock” type of music. Yet, they do that Pavement/Modest Mousey/90s experimentally-opened indie pop thing by making all of the elements just a bit weird. There’s fuzz over the intro beat to first track “Treat” that makes the snares sound like they’re coming out of era-appropriately shitty speakers, the guitars often twiddle around in slightly-out-of-tune land, tracks don’t stick to the typical song structure completely (like how “Treat” just ends quickly, when it damn feels like it should). The three tracks also fulfill the promise of bands like Pavement that didn’t shy away from accessing a wide palette of emotions and song-types within their genre by jumping around in the soundscape, from the up and fun energy (though still fully slacker-style) of “Treat” to the pretty thoughtfulness of “Phase” to the plodding, enveloping sound of very (oddly for a slow track) short “Color.”

These three tracks are music that, since I came across it, I keep coming back to for the right reasons when it comes to songs that play on old grounds: it’s nostalgic, but it’s fresh to death in that it does its own thing with these sounds from the past. It’s warm and inviting to this dude from the era who remembers suburban half-malaise- it reminds me of trips to the record store with a car full of friends who could barely afford the gas, the record store being not where you went to buy shit for a trendy collection, but the place that mostly sold CDs and you went because you knew you’d hear shit you just would never have found anywhere else. It’s music whose hand I wistfully want to hold on the hood of a car on the single hill overlooking our small hometown that we both feel weird about and want to leave, but both sorta know it’s a time and place we’ll look back on and miss.

I’d be interested to know how these tracks sit with kids born in the post-1989 set, but I’d venture to guess that there’s a ton here to love for you guys as well, what with the eternal fetishization of the past being a thing and indie like this still, as these tracks prove, obviously riding strong in the cultural zeitgeist. Give it a try yourself below, and if you have any feels on this here music that makes me feel old and young at the same time, let this semi-foagie know in the comments below. We’ll likely be getting to the Loafer section of this soon as well here on The Deli, though you should certainly go ahead and give ‘er a listen now, as it’s also damn decent indie weirdness. Slack lives, y’all.

September 11, 2015

Milk and Cereal, released in May 2015, is the title of the newest album from June 2015 Artist Of The Month: Malandros. The 4-piece, heavy reverb, surfer rock sounds of Milk and Cereal make you want to sit out in your backyard with a piña colada and your feet dipped into hot pink kiddie pool. From the clean chops of the lead guitar to the rolling punch of the bass, Malandros’ new album has some wonderful new tunes for you to soak your head in. The song ‘Hollow Eyes’ makes you want to cruise a little red convertible on some winding roads in the middle of nowhere. This is one to definitely put the top down to, so get a good listen on below.


Taylor Mangiameli

September 10, 2015


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